Austroads: Transport Research and Trends

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Paving our ways

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This webinar presents a book “Paving Our Ways”, which references Austroads’ research and provides a comprehensive international history of the world’s pavements, running from the earliest human settlements to the present day. No previous book has covered such a broad canvass.

The book is written for general and technically oriented readers, tracing the human and social aspects of pavement development and use and providing detailed technical background. It also caters to students of engineering and transport wishing to broaden their knowledge of their profession or taking a course in the history and sociology of engineering.

“Paving Our Ways” provides interesting and curious asides about the stranger aspects of pavements. It explores the controversies surrounding the development of macadam pavements and, later, of asphalt pavements in a way that provides many insights into modern pavements. It also examines the subsequent competition between pavements using bituminous or cementitious binders.

The book covers three major time zones. The first is from the times of the Egyptian pharaohs to the end of the Roman era, the second is from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the First World War during which people like Tresaguet, Telford and McAdam had major impacts, and the third is from the end of the First World War to the present time when motorised trucks and machinery dramatically changed the way the pavements were made and used.

Looking back on the way current pavement technologies evolved, the authors of the book Maxwell Lay, formerly Director ConnectEast and Australian Road Research Board, John Metcalf, Formerly Louisiana State University, USA and Kieran Sharp, Road Eng. Assoc. of Asia and Australasia show how Australian practice relates to international practice.

Austroads Technical Specifications for Roadworks and Bridgeworks

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Currently, most Austroads member agencies rely on their unique technical specifications for the delivery of roadworks and bridge projects. In many cases, these specifications have been developed over a number of years in consultation with local industry and suppliers.

While it is recognised that there will always be some requirements that will only apply to a single jurisdiction, standardising specifications (and the associated test methods) has the potential to improve work processes for road agencies, suppliers and contractors.

To increase efficiency for road agencies and industry and optimise compliance with contract requirements, 14 technical specifications have been published for all Austroads member agencies to use for the construction of roadworks and bridgeworks. These specifications are suitable for use with any general conditions of contract, including design and construct contracts. They are expected to be used in conjunction with supplementary local or contract specific requirements.

This webinar, presented by Richard Edwards, takes participants through the technical specifications development process and provides an overview of the structure and layout adopted for the specifications.

Development of Design Procedures for Lightly Bound Cemented Materials in Flexible Pavements

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The addition of a small amount of cementitious binder to non-standard granular materials may result in a fit for purpose base or subbase at a significantly lower cost than crushed rock complying with standard specifications. Such lightly bound cemented (LBC) materials have particular use in pavement rehabilitation and heavy patching as they are less susceptible to block cracking and crocodile cracking than cemented materials.

The binder content and strength of LBC materials are significantly lower than heavily bound cemented (HBC) materials. Austroads’ recent report, which reviewed the performance of selected Queensland pavements with LBC bases, has shown that it is possible to design and construct a low-strength material with base thickness and subbase support sufficient to limit the extent of the micro cracking development that leads to macro-cracking.

Considering the use and performance of LBC for moderate to heavily trafficked roads, a structural design method was developed for pavements containing LBC materials and HBC materials in the post fatigue cracking phase of life, including:

  • A new elastic characterisation method, applicable to LBC materials and HBC materials in the fatigue cracked state, including methods to vary the design modulus according to the design modulus of the layer supporting the cracked material and the thickness and modulus of the overlying bound materials.
  • Design charts to select LBC base thicknesses to inhibit the development of block cracking and crocodile cracking, with the minimum thickness varying with design traffic loading and the support provided by the layer under the LBC base.

This webinar, presented by Dr Geoff Jameson and Dr James Grenfell, explains the structural design method in detail, including its development and application.

Implications of Pavement Markings for Machine Vision

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Introducing automated vehicles could dramatically impact the Australian and New Zealand travelling public’s driving experience and the industry’s approach to road safety and road design. This journey will undoubtedly take many years and considerable efforts in partnerships, testing, certification, design and legislation. A growing range of vehicles already available in the market offer automated-steering functions enabled by Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems (ADAS). Their performance depends on the vehicle’s technology and the environment where they are used. Greater consistency and quality in pavement markings will benefit not only automated vehicles but also all road users.

This webinar, presented on 21 October 2020 by Julien Marr, April Zhang, Scott Benjamin and John Wall, focuses on the outcomes of the Austroads research project, which was conducted to understand how longitudinal pavement markings affect automated steering functions and how existing design and maintenance practices could be improved.

Standards Australia: Bitumen and Related Materials for Roads

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This webinar, presented by Robert Urquhart on 11 August 2020, gives an overview of an Austroads project which provided expert technical input into the update of four Australian standards which were revised by the Standards Australia Technical Committee CH-025 ‘Bitumen and related products for roadmaking’.

This webinar describes the main changes that have occurred during revision of the following standards:

  • AS 2341.3 Determination of kinematic viscosity
  • AS 2341.12 Determination of penetration
  • AS 2341.18 Determination of softening point
  • AS 3568 Oils for reducing the viscosity of bituminous binders for pavements.

Introduction to the Life Cycle Costing Framework and its Application to Sealed Roads

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This webinar, faciliated by Tyrone Toole, Phil Hunt and Ranita Sen on 17 June 2020, focuses on the life-cycle costing framework and a suite of practical examples to demonstrate how to assess the best use of available marginal and non‑standard materials in sealed roads in different geographical and climactic conditions in Australia.

Introduction to the Life-Cycle Costing Framework and its Application to Unsealed Roads

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This webinar, presented on 30 June 2020 by Zia Rice, Tyrone Toole and Lory Noya, looks specifically into the use of the life-cycle costing framework and the important components that are considered for the assessment of an unsealed road. Special guest speakers from ARRB’s Asset Management team provide greater detail into the life-cycle costing examples through the presentation of several case studies.

Introduction to the Life-Cycle Costing Framework and its Application to Unsealed Roads

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This webinar, presented on 30 June 2020 by Zia Rice, Tyrone Toole and Lory Noya, looks specifically into the use of the life-cycle costing framework and the important components that are considered for the assessment of an unsealed road. Special guest speakers from ARRB’s Asset Management team provide greater detail into the life-cycle costing examples through the presentation of several case studies.

Sustainable Roads Through Fit-for-purpose Use of Available Materials

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This webinar, presented on 15 April 2020, provides an overview of the key components which influence fit-for-purpose material selection for low to medium volume regional and rural roads.

It covers:

  • material performance and risk assessment
  • risk reduction techniques
  • materials option assessment
  • life cycle cost assessment process.

It considers material properties, traffic, climate, material modification and stabilisation, and life-cycle-cost implications. Case studies provide real-life, practical examples.

It was presented by Mick Savage, Zia Rice and Tyrone Toole.

Guide to Pavement Technology Part 5: Pavement Evaluation and Treatment Design

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This webinar, presented on 22 August 2019, provides an overview of the key changes to the Guide to Pavement Technology Part 5: Pavement Evaluation and Treatment Design, and the significant advances in the thickness design of structural treatments for flexible road pavements.

It covers:

  • an overview of the pavement evaluation process and selection of treatment options
  • use of Travelling Speed Deflectometer (TSD) to design granular overlays
  • new procedures for mechanistic-empirical design of strengthening treatments.

Presented by Geoff Jameson and Dr Michael Moffatt.

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